Do Green Cheek Conures Get Along With Cockatiels?

Once I started thinking about getting a second bird as a companion for my green cheek conure.

I have generally thought cockatiels are very lovely, with their pretty cheeks and sweet, lovable whistles. They are really famous pet birds, so I got to thinking.

Can green cheek conures coexist with cockatiels?

The answer to this question is no. Unfortunately, cockatiels will not get along with green cheek conures in one house. Not that it’s completely impossible, but you won’t know the outcome until you get a cockatiel and introduce it to your green cheek conure. Still, the consequences can be damaging. 

So, in my opinion, this is not worth it. 

Let’s see what differences both birds have and why they can’t get along well in one apartment.

What Is a Green Cheek Conure?

Green cheek conure is a small Pyrrhura genus bird from South America forests. They can be around 10 inches big. Usually, they live in captivity for 20-30 years long.

They like socializing and are very active birds. Still, they are the quietest among other parrot species. This trait makes them perfect pets if you live in an apartment.

What Is a Cockatiel?

Cockatiels belong to the Nymphicus genus and originate from Australia. These birds can be around 11-12 inches big. Their lifespan in captivity lasts for 16 to 25 years with proper care.

These parrots are famous for their unmistakable whistle and love of copying melodies.

Their easygoing and agreeable nature makes them popular among bird lovers.

Typically, cockatiels produce lots of dander, making them a lousy choice for allergic people and those with respiratory diseases.

What Are the Potential Problems of Having a Cockatiel and a Conure Together?

Compatibility Concerns

It will be difficult to tell if the birds will get along well until you actually put them together into one cage. So you never know beforehand.

Bullying And Domination

Conures are bigger and tend to dominate over the territory. If they don’t make friends with the cockatiel, this can result in bullying and dangerous behavior. Bullying is done in the form of physical attacks or preventing the other bird from eating. In this case, you need to supervise the eating time to ensure both birds get enough food and no one is starving.

If with all that, you often are away from home, the bullied bird will have no chance to escape the attacks of another bird. So there are pretty much safety concerns if you settle together two birds from different types.

Jealousy

Bringing the new bird into an established household may result in significant issues with jealousy. I always say that the bond between the owner and the bird is a critical point of keeping the bird at home. This can prompt harassment and savagery with similar security worries as above. Having more than one bird will require extra consideration from you in numerous ways.

Diseases

Not all illnesses have visible symptoms. Some diseases tend to disguise, so to find out if one of your birds is sick, you’ll need to check their poop or weight the bird. IN case you keep them in one cage ­– how would you tell whose poop is that? If you suspect one of the birds is sick, you’ll have to weigh it daily, which is very inconvenient.

If the disease is contagious, you’ll have two sick birds in your household.

To wrap up, getting these two birds will require more time and supervision. Even if you keep them separately, you still need to look after each interaction they may have. As conures are bigger and have stronger beaks, it will be easy for them to hurt the smaller cockatiel. With the conure’s dominant personality in mind, we won’t recommend keeping these two parrots together even though they are trendy pets.

What Birds Are a Good Fit for a Green Cheek Conure?

What if I am still eager to get a buddy for my green cheek conure? Traditionally pairing two birds of the same species works better. So for a green cheek conure, it’s better to get a conure companion.

Conures are probably going to coexist with other conures because they have comparable peculiarities, propensities, quirks, etc. In nature, conures create flocks with others and do get along well inside the flock. Still, there is no guarantee that two birds will get along well right away. This will still take time to get used to each other and create a bond between birds and the owner.

What It Takes to Pair Two Birds?

Carrying a second bird into the home requires a time of isolation, separate enclosures (to some extent at first), slow presentations, managed cooperation, and a ton of tolerance.

Although, many bird proprietors have effectively paired a wide range of birds, even from different species.

Nonetheless, matching birds that weren’t raised together is a risk, and matching various species is a much more colossal gamble.

If you are fortunate and have a decent match, you need to battle with other expected issues.

At the point when two birds live in a similar enclosure and get along, there is a gamble that they might bond.

Assuming they bond, they might conclude that they don’t require you and become less amicable toward you because their flock no longer acknowledges you. In case this happens, many owners send birds to rescue because they don’t know how they can revert the situation. As a result, you may feel stuck in the situation when your birds ignore you completely, and you have no other choice than refuse the bird.

There are so many things related to attempting to have a pair of birds together it is likely better for most bird proprietors to stay with one bird, create a proper bond with it and take significant consideration of the bird.

You can provide a bird with an eternal and cheerful existence without expecting to bring back different birds to be near them.

Specific individuals get the second bird since they feel remorseful, which is never a valid justification to risk causing such a lot of damage.